September 27, 2019 5 min read

Cannabidiol has emerged to the front lines of all natural health and wellness products, and many people around the world are boasting its ability to manage pain, inflammation, nausea, seizures, and much more. In fact, even the Arthritis Foundation, a major, non-profit health organization within the United States, has recently highlighted the public interest in CBD for joint pain, the main discomfort associated with Arthritis. 

The foundation mentioned the lack of federal regulations regarding the naturally derived cannabinoid, but also states that they have been on record "urging theFDA to expedite the study and regulation” of CBD-infused products. Further, they stated that the foundation has "has always welcomed new treatment options because no single drug, supplement or therapy works for everyone.

In that light, the foundation set out to provide their own CBD guidelines for those interested in giving it a shot for managing symptoms of arthritis. To do so, they employed the help of leading experts, including Daniel Clauw, MD, director of the Chronic Pain Research Center at the University of Michigan, andMary Ann Fitzcharles, MD, an associate professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec

The Arthritis Foundation is the very first major health organization to release such guidelines, but they aren't the only ones who have made positive statements in regards to Cannabidiol. In fact, in late 2017, the World Health Organization recommended that CBD should not be scheduled as a controlled substance across the world, referring to it as safe with little potential for abuse. This may have been an important forestep to the legalization of hemp in the United States, outlined in the 2018 Farm Bill.


CBD Guidelines for New Users, According to the Arthritis Foundation

In offering CBD Guidelines for adults with arthritis, the Arthritis Foundation quickly introduces the fact that CBD is mostly unregulated and anyone with arthritis who is interested in using CBD should first consult with their doctor. They also suggest that many people have anecdotally reported that CBD helped relieve certain symptoms associated with arthritis, like pain, inflammation, and insomnia, but others experienced no effects when using CBD. This suggests that CBD is not right for everyone, but could be useful for many and may be worth trying under a doctor’s guidance.

For adults who do wish to give CBD a shot, the Arthritis Foundation suggests taking CBD by mouth. They cite two popular forms of CBD, tinctures, and capsules. They also state that topicals could be a suitable option, though no study has yet provided evidence as to how much CBD can be absorbed through the skin. Many topical CBD products may also include other pain-relieving ingredients, like camphor or menthol, that may help. The foundation issues a warning to keep in mind while looking to purchase a new CBD product. “Buy from a reputable company that has each batch tested for purity, potency and safety by an independent laboratory and provides acertificate of analysis.”

Most importantly, the Arthritis Foundation covers its bases in providing some safety information, such asCBD’s potential to interact with some medications used for treating arthritis. They also warn patients that “CBD is not a substitute for disease-modifying treatment for inflammatory arthritis.” 


Also, they imperatively note that there is no widely-accepted, universal dosing guide for CBD products yet, and that arthritis patients who wish to try CBD for themselves are advised to start with small doses and increase slowly, monitoring their effects along the way. The website gives the following dosing recommendation:  

“Start with just a few milligrams of CBD in sublingual form twice a day. If relief is inadequate after one week, increase the dose by that same amount. If needed, go up in small increments over several weeks. If you find relief, continue taking that dose twice daily to maintain a stable level of CBD in the blood.” You can read the entire article, titled “Arthritis Foundation CBD Guidance for Adults with Arthritis” for more information. 


Does Research Support the Use of CBD for Joint Pain?

The Arthritis Foundation points to a lack of data regarding CBD's potential health benefits for arthritis in humans, but there are still several studies regarding CBD use in animals or in vitro situations that have led many people to try it for themselves. 

Onestudy says that CBD could be a solution for generalpain, including pain that is otherwise unresponsive to traditional treatments. This is because CBD may bind to the same neuroreceptors as pain signals to reduce the ability of pain signals to reach the brain. Research also identified the potential ofCBD to reduce inflammation through a similar process, by blocking signals of inflammation from reaching the brain. 

Yet another study looks at the potential correlation between CBD use and arthritis in animals. Thisstudy focuses on a transdermal (topical) application of CBD, and shows that signs of pain and inflammation are significantly reduced in arthritic mice after use. Another study showed that CBD offered a decrease in pain levels and an increase in activity levels in dogs with osteoarthritis. Much more research is needed to understand how CBD may affect those with arthritis, but existing evidence has led researchers to believe there may be some definite potential for the supplement. 


Where to Find CBD Products for Joint Pain

If you're looking to try CBD for joint pain, arthritis, or another condition that may respond to CBD, you can buy CBD online to easily access high-quality, fairly priced products. As outlined by the Arthritis Foundation's guidelines, you should make careful considerations regarding the product's purity and potency. Look for products from reputable brands that offer documentation of third-party lab-testing, use wholesome, natural ingredients, and offer a product and potency that works for you. 

With the foundation's "low-and-slow" dosing recommendation for new users in mind, we suggest considering aCBD tincture, or a sublingual form of Cannabidiol that can be easily measured in small increments. Another convenient option may beCBD capsules, which offer a dosing method that fits alongside most other medications, but as the foundation suggests, may only be appropriate for users who have already determined what dose of cannabidiol they need. When you buy CBD online, you can also find a variety ofCBD topicals, includingCBD muscle rubs or salves that may include other pain relieving ingredients. 


In our mission to be the best online CBD store, we commend the Arthritis Foundation’s efforts to offer organized guidance to arthritis sufferers curious about CBD. We also hope to offer you guidance in choosing a product, as well as awide variety of CBD products you can buy online. If you’re unsure where to start, you may consider reading “The Many Forms of CBD: Choosing the Best CBD Products for You.”







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